KYLE PATNAUDE
Menu

Till The Night
KYLE PATNAUDE Till The Night aluminum, aluminum metal print, rubber
Till The Night Installation Detail
2018
aluminum, aluminum metal print, rubber

KYLE PATNAUDE Till The Night aluminum, aluminum metal print
All Revolutions Devour Their Own Children
2018
aluminum, aluminum metal print
5" x 5" x 5"

KYLE PATNAUDE Till The Night aluminum, aluminum metal print
All Revolutions Devour Their Own Children
2018
aluminum, aluminum metal print
5" x 5" x 5"

KYLE PATNAUDE Till The Night turned aluminum, rubber
Todger, Honey Dipper, Batty Boy
2018
turned aluminum, rubber
18"x1.25" / 8"x1.25" / 10"x1.5"

KYLE PATNAUDE Till The Night aluminum photo print
Till The Night Installation
2017
aluminum photo print

National Redaction Series

KYLE PATNAUDE Till The Night rubber, aluminum, nickel
Jacksie
2018
rubber, aluminum, nickel
24" x 12"

KYLE PATNAUDE Till The Night Digital Photo Print
Jacksie
2018
Digital Photo Print
24" x 36"


2018
Historically, the cultural minefield of queer masculinity is not entirely alien. Ernst Röhm, a high ranking member of the German Workers’ Party and loyal Nazi compatriot of Adolf Hitler, was himself a flagrant homosexual. Opposing Paragraph 175, Röhm challenged heteronormative superiority indicating homosexual masculinity as the unsurpassed exemplar of supremacy. His prophetic words “All revolutions devour their own children” produce the homoromanticism of masculine power through this work. Disembodied mouths, both sexual and sinister—Aluminum truncheons, the weapon of police and symbol of authority, the tokens of masculine prowess and sexual deviance, this work confounds a clear distinction of the gay male narrative, eliciting plurality and double meaning. Where much of queer work celebrates the progressive gay narrative, I choose to cultivate from darker regions of my community and culture—the alternate inception of our history. Camp fetishization of police, the military, and yes, fascists and supremacists, incites the complex manifestation of homoromanticized masculine power constructs.
The Alt-Right caricature of gay fascism culminates in the queer skin-head antagonist Jacksie. Garlanded with a black rubber harness constructed from a recurrent manhole cover pattern, Jacksie confrontingly stands as a counter vanguard where the marginalized find a warped position of power. Contentious, hateful, and dedicated to sadomasochistic brotherhood, he nevertheless exists on the inevitable precipice—his expulsion and purge.